Home | Contact Us


Here you can find answers to some of our most asked questions. If your question is not answered here, email Alex Sitman at: MasterClass@atlanticbbn.net

Questions:

  1. What is Pillar Bedding?
  2. What about "drop in stocks"?
  3. Is fiberglass more stable than wood and wood laminates?
  4. Which is the best to build for meeting my needs, wood or fiberglass?
  5. Do you really need all the adjustable hardware?
  6. Can your NMC stock be used for prone matches as well?
  7. Is there a way I can measure myself to get a close measurement for my LOP?
  8. Do you build just your own or can I supply you with the components?
  9. Can I ship my rifle direct to you or do I need to go through an FFL?
  10. What is the best way to ship?

Q. What is Pillar Bedding?

A. Pillar bedding is basically the same as conventional or surface bedding with an added step where "pillars" or columns under each receiver screw are made from either the epoxy resins used in the bedding process, or they can be made from other materials such as aluminum or stainless steel. The purpose of the pillars is to keep the receiver screws or bushings from collapsing into the stock. When this happens, accuracy suffers. Properly done, pillar bedding is the most stable of bedding techniques. (more info)

top of page

Q. What about "drop-in stocks"?

A. "Drop-in" stocks suggest that you can drop your barreled action into a specific stock and go shoot. A lot here depends on your accuracy needs. We have seen some of them work well for hunting rifles, but we feel that there is no room for "drop-in" stocks in target shooting. Hereís why. If a stock inletted for a Remington 700 can be used with 50 different Remington 700ís, then there has to be excessive tolerances somewhere. These tolerances usually occur around the recoil lug and here is where down range accuracy comes in. Rifles were the lug is left "loose" in the bedding have a greater chance of giving the shooter horizontal stringing from the torque put on the action upon firing. For this reason and the fact that the stock isnít mated properly to the action, the stock should be at least surfaced bedded to snug up these areas. Properly done, accuracy should be increased.

top of page

Q. Is fiberglass more stable than wood and wood laminates?

A. Fiberglass has the potential to be more stable if properly built. The fiberglass stocks will not take on the elements like wood, but even wood and wood laminates can be made stable. The key to stabilizing wood is good thick bedding, not only along the bottom, but the sides also. When done in this way, any moisture taken on by the stock shouldnít affect accuracy. In addition to the bedding, care has to be given to sealing the barrel channel and all internal cuts. Carl Bernosky won all his nationals with a laminated stock, and John Hoover recently set the 16Ĺ-lb class World Record score at 1000 yards with a laminated stock we built for him. The key is being built solid and properly.

top of page

Q. Which is the best to build for meeting my needs, wood or fiberglass?

A. This is a question we get asked a lot. If you have the glass stock in hand and it feels good to you as is, then build the glass. A lot of inexperienced shooters donít really know what feels good so wood or wood laminates seem to fit their bill pretty good. With the wood stock, a shooter can whittle away until the stock feels good to him or her, sort of like doing their own custom fitting. With glass stocks, you have the capabilities of building up areas to fit you better, but extreme care should be taken if you try to take away material. A reduction of strength may result.

top of page

Q. Do you really need all the adjustable hardware?

A. Nine out of ten times yes. The adjustable hardware allows the shooter to fit the rifle to him or her instead of themselves to the rifle. Usually the most important piece of hardware a shooter needs to keep shot to shot consistency is the adjustable cheekpiece.

top of page

Q. Can your NMC stock be used for prone matches as well?

A. Yes, the taper on the forearm is very compatible with a lot of prone shooters. Also, the depth of the forearm at the prone position is about the same as our prone stock. Some shooters like having the same feel with their stocks, regardless of the discipline they are using it in.

top of page

Q. Is there a way I can measure myself to get a close measurement for my LOP?

A. The simplest method is to measure yourself from the crease of your elbow to your trigger finger in the crooked position. I usually use a yardstick for this. This gives a good starting point for the length of pull in the off-hand position. Allowance should be made for the shooting coat. Normally the sitting and prone positions require a longer length of pull, which the 3-way buttplate should accommodate. Click here for illustrations on LOP measurements.

top of page

Q. Do you build just your own or can I supply you with the components?

A. We will gladly build other makers component as long as they are of good quality. If someone has something that feels good to you, then by all means build it up. Sometimes it is necessary for us to build up what we think may be weak spots in the stock, especially in working fiberglass. If this is needed, we always give the customer an explanation why and get their approval before starting.

top of page

Q. Can I ship my rifle direct to you or do I need to go through an FFL?

A. The BATF rules state that if you own the firearm then you can legally ship to a Federally Licensed Dealer or Gunsmith and they can legally return shipment directly to you. For you to legally own the firearm, all necessary paperwork needs to be done prior to the shipment to the Dealer or Gunsmith. Be sure to consult your local Dealer if you have questions concerning your own state laws and shipping instructions.

top of page

Q. What is the best way to ship?

A. UPS is still #1 but FedEx is gaining ground. Be sure to ship in a hard rifle case with a cardboard wrapper. I will not return ship any rifle in just a cardboard box. Be sure to insure the firearm for full value. Also BATF rules state that you must have an "adult signature required" label on the package. Some helpful hints:

  • In most cases, separate the stock from the barreled action.
  • Remove bolt from action and wrap separately.
  • Try to protect the trigger shoe with cardboard or similar material.
  • Protect the muzzle and the tang of the barreled action by wrapping them in foam or like material.
  • Likewise, wrap the stock if being sent, separately also.
  • Wrap the rifle case in cardboard or reverse the cardboard sleeve the case came in as to have no markings on the outside indicating that your are shipping a rifle.

top of page

 

Privacy Policy© 2003 Master Class Stocks and Shooting Accessories, Inc.Designed by: Digital Age Web, LLC